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Eostra’s Dream of Spring

Eostra's Dream of Spring

Eostra is derived from Ostara, Eostre or Eostrae, the teutonic goddess of dawn, fertility and spring. The name is derived from the old English name Eosturmonath for the month of April. In one of the more colourful stories about this goddess, she is said to have been the bride of the young earl of May. There are, admittedly, sources telling other tales, but we prefer this one and find it most suitable for our necklace which was made from a piece of bali fabric in pinks and only the slightest hints of grey and purple – in short, the colours of dawn... (3 May 2011)

The Easy Denim Cushion

Easy Denim Cushion

The Easy Denim Cushion is the result of a very spontaneous brainwave connected with an old Denim shirt and the lack of a zipper... (27 April 2011)

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Krinoline (Quilting Motif)

Krinoline (Quilting Motif)

The Krinoline is one of the oldest joyrides on the famous Oktoberfest in Munich. When it was first opened to the public in the 1920s, it was a sensation. Reminiscent of the huge hoop skirts ladies used to wear in the 1860s, the Krinoline really seems to dance to the Waltz rhythm played by the brass band which luckily hasn’t been replaced by a CD player. When you next pay a visit to the Oktoberfest, do take a ride in the Krinoline... (originally published on 2 April 2011)

Crazy Wootsal

Crazy Wootsal

... Wootsal is an anglicized version of the Bavarian “Wutzerl”, a noun used for anything very small ranging from babies to very small dogs and usually with a positive connotation. “Ja, so a kloans Wutzerl” (“Oh my, such a little mite”) might, no pun intended, be the ecstatic cry of a grandmother when she sets eyes on her new-born grandchild for the very first time.... (01 April 2011)

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Fold-Back Binding

Fold-Back Binding

Fold-back binding is a simple method for binding. On the front of the quilt it creates an interesting visual effect because the binding simply isn’t visible. The quilt ends with the outer border which seems to float in its surroundings without any boundary.... (20 March 2011)

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Tie a Yellow Ribbon - Finishing

Tie a Yellow Ribbon

Small quilts are a very rewarding experience. They look terrific, can be used as wall-hangings in the smallest of flats, and they are a challenge without taking up too much time to complete. This applies to all stages in quiltmaking: piecing, assembly, quilting, and also to the very last stage – to finishing the quilt. No cutting and sewing of endless binding strips to never ending quilt edges, not to mention the thousands of invisible hand stitches needed to finish the binding for a large quilt... (originally published on 19 March 2011)

Needle Book

Needle Book

... we decided to create a needle book. Our version is really easy to make, and extremely useful. Our outer cover is a work sample left over from the picture series made for “Crazy Quilting by Hand”, but there is a great variety of other options: a piece of fabric with an interesting pattern, an orphan block, a Confetti picture and much, much more... (18 March 2011)

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Netbook Cover

Netbook Cover

Felt is a great material. It is easy to work with, the edges don’t fray, it is durable and, provided its thick enough, shock absorbent. In short: a great choice to make covers for sensitive electronic equipment. Felt also comes in great varieties of colour and quality. There is the really cheap variety sold in craft shops. On the other side of the price range, you can find exquisite wool felt soft enough to make clothes from... (14 March 2011)

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Double Grid (Quilting Motif)

Double Grid (Quilting Motif)

The Harlekin quilt is quilted entirely by hand which, in such a large quilt, is an ambitious endeavour. Therefore, the quilt patterns chosen for this quilt leave it to you how much work you would like to do. The overall design consists of several components and you are free to decide yourself how much quilting you would like to do.... (originally published on 13 March 2011)

Harlekin Assembly

Harlekin Assembly

The Harlekin quilt has a horizontal setting with 16 Harlekin blocks that are separated from each other by 5” (12.5 cm) wide pieced sashings. We have set the blocks in alternating orientation, i.e. in one block the diagonal runs from top left to bottom right and vice versa.

The quilt centre is framed by two borders with corner squares. The inner medium blue border is 2” (5 cm) wide, the outer border cut from burgundy red fabric is 8” (20 cm) wide.... (originally published on 24 February 2011)

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